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FELCIFIC CALCULUS

 

Hedonistic /felicific calculus Of Jeremy Bentham As an ethical hedonist, the 18th-19th-century English utilitarian philosopher and proto-bleeding-heart-liberal Jeremy Bentham, believed that right and wrong could be determined by weighing the “pleasures” and “pains” of any given action, with an action that produced more pleasure than pain being morally right. To determine an individual’s pleasure or pain from an action, Bentham suggested weighing Intensity (pleasure’s strength), Duration (how long pleasure would last), Certainty (the probability action will result in pleasure), Propinquity (how soon the pleasure might occur), Fecundity (the chance the pleasure would result in further actions), and Purity (the probability these further actions would be pleasures and not pains). He also added Extent, taking into account the effects of said decision on other people. Felicific calculus Utilitarianism • Look up felicific calculus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. The felicific calculus is an algorithm formulated by utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham for calculating the degree or amount of pleasure that a specific action is likely to cause. Bentham, an ethical hedonist, believed the moral rightness or wrongness of an action to be a function of the amount of pleasure or pain that it produced. The felicific calculus could, in principle at least, determine the moral status of any considered act. The algorithm is also known as the utility calculus, the hedonistic calculus and the hedonic calculus. Variables, or vectors, of the pleasures and pains included in this calculation, which Bentham called "elements" or "dimensions", were:[clarification needed] 1. Intensity: How strong is the pleasure? 2. Duration: How long will the pleasure last? 3. Certainty or uncertainty: How likely or unlikely is it that the pleasure will occur? 4. Propinquity or remoteness: How soon will the pleasure occur? 5. Fecundity: The probability that the action will be followed by sensations of the same kind. 6. Purity: The probability that it will not be followed by sensations of the opposite kind. 7. Extent: How many people will be affected? Bentham's instructions • Begin with any one person of those whose interests seem most immediately to be affected by it: and take an account, o Of the value of each distinguishable pleasure which appears to be produced by it in the first instance. o Of the value of each pain which appears to be produced by it in the first instance. o Of the value of each pleasure which appears to be produced by it after the first. This constitutes the fecundity of the first pleasure and the impurity of the first pain. o Of the value of each pain which appears to be produced by it after the first. This constitutes the fecundity of the first pain, and the impurity of the first pleasure. • Sum up all the values of all the pleasures on the one side, and those of all the pains on the other. The balance, if it be on the side of pleasure, will give the good tendency of the act upon the whole, with respect to the interests of that individual person; if on the side of pain, the bad tendency of it upon the whole. • Take an account of the number of persons whose interests appear to be concerned; and repeat the above process with respect to each. Sum up the numbers expressive of the degrees of good tendency, which the act has, with respect to each individual, in regard to whom the tendency of it is good upon the whole. Do this again with respect to each individual, in regard to whom the tendency of it is bad upon the whole. Take the balance which if on the side of pleasure, will give the general good tendency of the act, with respect to the total number or community of individuals concerned; if on the side of pain, the general evil tendency, with respect to the same community.[1] To make his proposal easier to remember, Bentham devised what he called a "mnemonic doggerel" (also referred to as "memoriter verses"), which synthesized "the whole fabric of morals and legislation": Intense, long, certain, speedy, fruitful, pure— Such marks in pleasures and in pains endure. Such pleasures seek if private be thy end: If it be public, wide let them extend Such pains avoid, whichever be thy view: If pains must come, let them extend to few. INTRODUCED BY NGONDWE IGNATIUS

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Comments: 2

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  • #2

    Masticating Juicer (Sunday, 21 April 2013 17:45)

    This is an excellent blog post! Thank you for sharing with us!

  • #1

    Carwaysir (Tuesday, 14 August 2012 02:52)

    Tell me how come!

Comments: 3

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  • #3

    jokins (Thursday, 21 June 2012 01:11)

    i have a problem with my land who is asking for big sums yet is providing poor health facilities

  • #2

    jokins (Tuesday, 12 June 2012 09:49)

    good start

  • #1

    ngondwe ignatius (Tuesday, 12 June 2012 09:39)

    welcome a board